ETL 504: Module 2- Post 1

Module 2

Don Tapscott outlined 4 principles of an open world:

  • collaboration;
  • transparency;
  • sharing; and
  • empowerment.

 

How can these principles be applied to school libraries or teacher librarians?  

Collaboration

Collaboration needs to occur between the TL, teachers, executive staff, the principal, students and other school stakeholders. This collaboration will help attain goals at all levels as well as assist in the development of a whole school approach to learning. It can be seen for example through TLs team teaching with other teachers, collaborating ideas with the teachers/students on events such as Children’s Book Week and TLs and teachers collaborating during programing sessions.

Transparency

Transparency occurs through communication between the TL, teachers, executive staff, the principal, students and other school stakeholders. This can be seen for example through cross curricular lessons and discussing and promoting the use of available resources to students and teachers.

Sharing

Sharing can be seen for example through telling other faculties what resources are in the library and finding out what resources are in their faculties. Building upon these resources together promotes the sharing of them. Sharing online resources via email, Edmodo, etc is another example.

Empowerment

Empowerment can be seen for example through encouraging and assisting with the use of technology by students, staff and other school stakeholders, teaching students how to research in the library and on the internet and creating leadership positions such as library monitors for students.

 

Consider how this understanding of the 4 principles can support you in leading change at your school or in your school library?

I would ensure

  • I have a good understanding of my school resources
  • I understand how to use, implement and share skills and resources associated with technology
  • I am open to others opinions
  • I am prepared to change
  • I understand that the leadership also involves being lead at times i.e. utilising others strengths and trusting them to take charge.
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ETL 504 Module 1- Post 2

Module 1

Post 2: Thinking about leadership, as you discussed in the previous activity on the forum. What leadership styles are demonstrated in your school? What type of leader do you think you are? What type would you like to be?

I have seen a range of leadership styles demonstrated in my school. The styles in which I have to deal with most include autocratic, democratic and transformational. Each of these leadership styles works for the individual who demonstrates it.

According to the Buzzle leadership style quiz (Dhavale, 2014) my results showed that my leadership style is democratic. I agree with these results as I do always endeavour to listen to others opinions and take them into consideration when making my own decision.

Reference

Dhavale, G. (9, April, 2014). Leadership Styles Quiz. Retrieved from http://www.buzzle.com/articles/leadership-styles-quiz.html

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ETL 504: Module 1- Post 1

Module 1

Post 1: What is your understanding of leadership? How do you show leadership in your school?

I think leadership requires:

  • an individual to have the respect and a rapport with those they wish to lead
  • the ability to create a future plan and have the knowledge of how to set realistic and achievable goals related to accomplishing the plan
  • an ability to think forward, take risks and have the confidence to see ideas through to the end
  • an individual to be creative and have the skills to communicate, collaborate and delegate

I show leadership in my school by:

  • listening and taking into consideration the opinions and suggestions of teacher and students
  • discussing and creating future plans with the executives as well as my library team
  • putting forward my own ideas to the executives
  • setting my own goals and helping others in my library team to set their goals
  • making sure these goals work towards achieving the future plan
  • keeping track of and documenting progress of my goals and my teams goals
  • evaluating my goals
  • working with students to set and achieve goals in class
  • organising events and activities around the school such as Children’s Book Week
  • mentoring as an assistant year advisor
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ETL 503 Assessment 2 Part C: Reflection

Part C: Reflection

In reflecting on this subject and this assessment I have developed an understanding of how to build upon the collection at the school I currently work at.  I have developed my ideas on the selection and acquisitions of resources though completing this assignment, assessment task one and module 2. By analysing Hughes-Hassell and Mancall’s (2005, p. 46-47) learner-centred selection criteria and creating an adapted version to meet the needs of my school (Valenzuela, 2014), as well as blogging about how I select suppliers (Valenzuela, 2014), I now have the ability to select and acquire resources for the school collection confidently instead of using the hit and miss tactic I used previously.

According to the ASLA (2013, p.8), “there is a positive relationship between well-resourced libraries and higher student literacy outcomes”. I now have a better understanding of a well-resourced library and now know how to improve the balance in my school collection. As discussed in my module one blog post although print books are increasingly being converted to e-books, there still needs to be a balance of both print and digital resources in the collection (Valenzuela, 2014). Shatzkin (2013) discusses that not all books have been successfully been converted to e-books therefore highlighting the need for both print and digital resources. Although digital resources are rapidly becoming more common in school libraries, until there becomes a flawless accessing tool, that make all forms of digital resources affordable and easily available, there needs to be a balance of print and digital resources. Through this assessment I have also broaden my knowledge on balancing fiction and non-fiction resources. Using documents such as the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority’s (ACARA) new Australian Curriculum, I have began to identify how different resources can align with the teaching and learning needs in the Australian Curriculum.

I feel I can now justify the need to evaluate the collection and weed individual resources without the guilt from myself as well as other staff, which so often comes with this task. I have taken on Miller’s (2011) MUSTY acronym to use while weeding the collection in my school library.

I have never had to deal with a challenge to the collection, however I now feel I can deal with such a situation easily if it presents itself. I support the Australian Library and Information Association’s (ALIA) statement on free access to information (2007) and will include this statement in my own school library collection policy.

The content from this subject as well as the skills learnt from this assessment have developed my knowledge of the library collection in regards to the teaching and learning environment. It has also given me the skills to confidently create and manage a school library collection as well as create and manage a school library collection policy.

 

Reference

Australian Library and Information Association. (2007). Statement on free access to information. Retrieved from https://www.alia.org.au/about-alia/policies-standards-and-guidelines/statement-free-access-information

Australian School Library Association. (2013). Future learning and school libraries. Retrieved from http://www.asla.org.au/site/DefaultSite/filesystem/documents/2013-ASLA-futures-paper.pdf

Hughes-Hassell, Sandra; Mancall, Jaqueline C. (2005). Collection Management for Youth : Responding to the Needs of Learners. Retrieved from http://www.csuau.eblib.com.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=289075&echo=1&userid=z%2fOioPKZpXZST4YN08WgVw%3d%3d&tstamp=1396759146&id=EF092BF7CAAC3B246900F888DA773921C66A9519

Miller, D. (2011). Weeding not just for gardeners . Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/debmille/weeding-not-just-for-gardens

Shatzkin (2013, January 2). What to watch for in 2013 [Blog Post]. Retrieved from http://www.idealog.com/blog/what-to-watch-for-in-2013/

Valenzuela, H. (2014, March 8). ETL 503- Module 1 [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://hannav102.wordpress.com/2014/03/08/etl-501-module-1/  

Valenzuela, H. (2014, April 6). ETL 503 Adapted selection criteria [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://hannav102.wordpress.com/2014/04/05/342/

Valenzuela, H. (2014, June 1). ETL 503 Module 3 [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://hannav102.wordpress.com/2014/06/01/etl503-module-3/  

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ETL503 Module 3

Draw up a checklist of the desirable qualities that you would look for in preferred school library suppliers.

Factors that need to be considered when selecting suppliers:

– Do they provide a range of resources?
– Are the resources of quality?
– Are they knowledgeable in regards to the curriculum needs?
– Are they desperate to sell because of the commission they receive?
– Do they listen provide resources to your wants needs?
– Do they provide discounts for returning customers?
– Do they promote specials?
– Are they quick to respond to queries and mistakes? (I once ordered a teenage fiction book, but received a erotic novel instead. 2 moths later and after sending it back twice, I received what I ordered).
-Do they provide a preview period or online previews?

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ETL 503 Assessment task 1: Part B- Annotated resource list on curriculum topic

Part B– Annotated resource list on curriculum topic

The resources selected have been compared to selection criteria adapted from Hughes-Hassell & Mancall’s (2005, p. 46-47) learner-centred contextualised general selection criteria (Valenzuela, 2014). Not all of the selections will be added to the collection.

The selection aids used are numbered below:

 

  1. SCIS catalogue
  2. Scootle
  3. Curriculum press
  4. Booktopia
  5. Apple app store
  6. Teacher
  7. Cambridge Publisher

 

Boyer, C. (2012). Everything Ancient Egypt. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic.

 

This resource is a large print book, which contains 64 pages. It is targeted at grades 3-7. It contains an overview of a variety of topics about ancient Egypt. It will be used as an overview resource.

This resource meets the general selection criteria in the following ways:

 

Primary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Appropriateness Is at a reading level suitable for targeted students from low SES, ELA/D and/or Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islanders background.
Scope Information coincides with unit topics.
Accuracy Information is up-to-date.
Treatment Presentation will appeal to targeted students.
Arrangement & organisation Information is organised in a way that is clear and easy to understand.
Authority National geographic is a reliable source.
Format Size and layout of the book is not confronting for students and should engage them.

 

Secondary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Physical quality Pictures and snippets of information support the learning style of targeted students.

 

Selection aids 1 and 4 were used to locate this resource.

1 was useful as it has large amounts of different resources as well as an advanced search option which allows for users to get more specific results which saves time. The year published and format options were used to assist in finding this resource. The summary and the review were also helpful in identifying the usefulness of this resource.

4 was used to assist in identifying the age group that this item will be suitable for.

 

British Museum. (2010). Ancient Egypt. Retrieved from British Museum website: http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/menu.html

 

This resource is a comprehensive and interactive website. The simple language used on the website along with the layout and challenges, indicate that it is targeted at students. It contains an extensive amount of information covering many topics to do with ancient Egypt. This resource will be used for deeper research.

This resource meets the general selection criteria in the following ways:

 

Primary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Appropriateness Content is detailed, but still at the reading level of targeted students. It provides links to definitions which provide extra support.
Scope Detail is appropriate for deeper research. The topics include information related to the following curriculum content: ACDSEH002, ACDSEH033, ACDSE129
Accuracy Material is up-to-date
Treatment Interactive presentation of information will gauge the interest of targeted students.
Arrangement & organisation Links to definitions and the story/explore/challenge options cater for and challenge a range of learners.
Authority Reliable source
Format Compatible with iPad and computer software. Medium is engaging.

 

Selection aid 2 was used to locate this resource.

2 was useful as it has an advanced search option which allows the user to get specific results which saves time. The publication, year level and source options were successfully used to assist in finding this resource. These options also allowed for specificity to the learner. The option to view it in the curriculum again makes it specific and easy to use.

 

Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc. (2011). Britannica Kids- Ancient Egypt (Version 2.1) [iPad application software]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/britannica-kids-ancient-egypt/id388254830?mt=8

 

This resource is an iPad application (app). The description indicates that only some of the necessary unit topics have been included. The interactive games seem basic and indicate that this app may be more suited to a younger group of students. Cost involved is $8.99.

This resource doesn’t meet the general selection criteria in the following ways:

Primary considerations

Criteria How criteria hasn’t been met
Appropriateness Below the targeted students development level.
Scope Does not support curriculum needs.
Comparison with other works There are other free applications that are more suited to targeted students needs.
Format School is still unable to purchase bulk iPad applications.

 

Secondary considerations

Criteria How criteria hasn’t been met
Physical quality Reviewer indicates that images are not quality and that information seems to be scanned.
Cost Unreasonable to ask students from low SES background to purchase application.

 

Selection aid 5 was used to locate this resource.

5 was useful as it has sample pages from the app, as well as provides a brief description of its contents. The review tab also proved valuable as an unbiased opinion was provided.

 

Fox, M. (2012). The ancient Egypt ebook. Retrieved from SCIS catalogue.

 

This resource is an ebook with the target audience being teachers. It contains an extensive amount of information related to the curriculum unit specified. This resource will be best suited as a teacher resource.

This resource meets the general selection criteria in the following ways:

 

Primary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Appropriateness Content is not appropriate for the learners level, however is appropriate for teachers who can manipulate the information into a form that is suitable for the targeted students.
Scope Resource has been linked with the Australian Curriculum: History
Accuracy Material is up-to-date and makes reference to valid and reliable sources.
Treatment Presentation is suitable for teacher and includes resources that teachers can use in lessons.
Authority Publisher has credible links to the Australian Curriculum.
Format Software is compatible with interactive whiteboards, computers, iPads and other mobile devices (Fox, 2012, p. 12).

 

Secondary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Cost As a teacher resource, it is value for money.

 

Selection aids 1 and 3 were used to locate this resource.

1 was useful as it contains a variety of different resources as well as an advanced search option which allows for user to get more specific results. The year published and format options were used to assist in finding this resource.

The link in 1 to selection aid 3 proved valuable as the information gained from the sample pages and Google preview provided a better understanding of how to use the resource.

 

Hurdman, C., Steele, P. & Tames, R. (2013). Find out about ancient Egypt, Rome & Greece. Anness Publishing.

 

This resource is a print book, which contains 256 pages. It is targeted at grades 3-7. It contains an overview of a variety of topics to do with ancient Egypt. It will be used as an overview resource.

This resource meets the general selection criteria in the following ways:

 

Primary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Appropriateness Content is at the development level of targeted students.
Accuracy Resource is up-to-date.
Arrangement & organisation Information is organised in a clear and structured manner.
Authority Authors have contributed to other reliable sources.
Format Format will engage students.

 

Secondary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Cost Is an affordable resource.

 

Selection aid 4 was used to locate this resource.

4 was used to gain access to new resources. The refine search option was useful to cull down the abundance of results. 4 was also used to assist in identifying the age group that this item is suitable for.

 

MAD Learning. (2012). Pocket history ancient Egypt (Version 2.1.1) [iPad application software]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/pocket-history-ancient-egypt/id406913983?mt=8

 

This resource is an iPad application. The description indicates that many necessary curriculum topics have been included. The resource is text dense however matches the reading level for a year 7 student. Many images are included to help explain the text. The app is free. This resource will be used for deeper research by students.

This resource meets the general selection criteria in the following ways:

 

Primary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Appropriateness Content is at an appropriate reading level.
Scope Information is detailed and correlates with the curriculum in many ways.
Accuracy Material is up-to-date.
Arrangement & organisation Information is easy to use and well structured.
Comparison with other works Provides more detailed information at the targeted students level when compared to the Britannica kids-Egypt app (Encyclopaedia Britannica, 2011)
Format Resource is easy to download onto student iPads.

 

Secondary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Cost App is free, making it accessible to all students including those from a low SES background.

 

Selection aid 5 was used to locate this resource.

5 was useful as it provides sample pages from the app as well as provides a brief description of its contents. As it was a free resource, it was useful to download it to view it. The resource is easy and quick to download meaning the full contents could be assessed within a couple of minutes.

 

Secrets of the afterlife: Magic, Mummies & immortality. (2013). Welshpool, WA: Western Australia Museum.

 

This resource is a large printed book, containing 68 pages. It includes some information related to the curriculum topic as well as information that isn’t relevant. The intended audience is the general population, meaning it won’t be as relevant to the targeted students.

This resource does not meet the general selection criteria in the following ways:

 

Primary considerations

Criteria How criteria hasn’t been met
Appropriateness Doesn’t match the targeted student’s development or reading level.
Scope Presents information about the contents of the British museum which doesn’t relate to the unit or curriculum.
Arrangement & organisation Information is arranged to suit the general population’s needs.
Format Format may be new to students as it is not specific to their level of development.

 

Secondary considerations

Criteria How criteria hasn’t been met
Physical quality Language used is targeted at the general population and not to students in year 7.

 

Selection aids 1 and 4 were used to locate this resource.

1 was useful as it has an abundance of different resources as well as an advanced search option which allows for users to get specific results. The year published and format options were used to assist in finding this resource. The summary was helpful in identifying the usefulness of this resource.

4 was used to assist in identifying the suitable age group. The summary influenced the decision that this resource won’t be added to the collection.

 

The Children’s University of Manchester. (2009). Ancient Egypt. Retrieved from The Children’s University of Manchester website: http://www.childrensuniversity.manchester.ac.uk/interactives/history/egypt/

 

This resource is an interactive website. The simple language used along with the layout and challenges, indicate that it is targeted at young students. It is still relevant to the targeted students especially those from an ELA/D background, as it is interactive. It contains information covering many topics to do with ancient Egypt. It will be used as tool to engage and interest students into the subject and for overview research.

This resource meets the general selection criteria in the following ways:

 

Primary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Appropriateness Matches the targeted students learning style and will engage the students.
Scope Information is brief, however still can be used as a starting point for students.
Treatment Presented in an appealing and engaging way.
Arrangement & organisation Structured, engaging and easy to use
Authority University of Manchester is a reliable source.
Format Only compatible with iPads when viewed within Puffin Web Browser Free app (CloudMosa Inc., 2013). Compatible with school computers.

 

Secondary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Physical quality Supports learning style of targeted students.

 

Selection aid 1 was used to locate this resource.

1 was useful due to the variety of different resources as well as an advanced search option which allows for the user to get more specific results. The format option was used to assist in finding this resource. The contents and link to the website was also helpful in identifying the usefulness of this resource.

 

The Paul Getty Museum. (2011). Mummification Process- animation. Retrieved from The Paul Getty Museum website: http://www.getty.edu/art/videos/mummification_process/mummification_process.html

This resource is an animation of a mummified body. The animation along with the narration provide information specific to the unit and more specifically to the assessment task. This resource will be used for deeper research.

This resource meets the general selection criteria in the following ways:

 

Primary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Appropriateness Will match targeted students learning style.
Scope Supports information required for assessment task.
Accuracy Resource is up-to-date.
Treatment Visual animation and narration appeal to learning needs.
Arrangement & organisation Follows step-by-step instructions in which can be stopped and replayed when needed.
Format Only compatible with iPad when viewed with in Puffin Web Browser Free app (CloudMosa Inc., 2013). Compatible with school computers.

 

Selection aid 2 was used to locate this resource.

2 was useful as it has an advanced search option which allow for the user to get specific results. The year level and source options were successfully used to assist in finding this resource. These options also allowed for specificity to the learner. The option to view it in the Australian Curriculum makes it specific and easy to use.

 

Woollacott, A. (2012). History for the Australian Curriculum 7. Teacher resource package. Series: No.1. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press.

 

This will provide teachers with addition resources to use alongside their class textbooks. It contains suggested responses to questions, research tasks, teaching programs and PowerPoint presentations related to the material in the class textbooks. These are downloadable and can be uploaded to the school network. This resource will be best suited as a teacher resource.

This resource meets the general selection criteria in the following ways:

 

Primary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Appropriateness Coincides with textbook which correlates with the Australian Curriculum.
Scope Supports teacher’s delivery of the unit.
Accuracy Has been created to correspond with the Australian curriculum.
Arrangement & organisation Arranged to coincide with the classroom textbook.
Format Can be uploaded onto the school network for easier use by teachers.

 

Secondary considerations

Criteria How criteria has been met
Reputation Previous textbooks were from the same publisher.
Cost Budgeted for in coordination with the history faculty.

Selection aids 6 and 7 were used to locate this resource.

6 was used to discuss prior resources, new resource options and finally the best resource to purchase.

7 was used to research the complete series of the resource. In discussion with 6 the resource will be budgeted for to coincide with the other student resources that the history faculty will purchase.

 

References

Apple. (2014). Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/au/genre/ios/id36?mt=8

Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2014). Australian Curriculum: History year 7. Retrieved from The Australian Curriculum website: http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/humanitiesandsocialsciences/history/Curriculum/F-10?y=7&s=HKU&s=HS&layout=1

Booktopia. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.booktopia.com.au/

Boyer, C. (2012). Everything Ancient Egypt. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic.

British Museum. (2010). Ancient Egypt. Retrieved from British Museum website: http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/menu.html

Cambridge University Press. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.cambridge.org/

Callow, J. (2010). I’m way more interested: using visual texts to engage students from a low SES background. SCAN, 29(3), 28-34.Retrieved from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/callow_29%203.pdf

CloudMosa Inc. (2013). Puffin Web Browser Free (Version 3.2.5) [iPad application software]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/puffin-web-browser-free/id472937654?mt=8

Curriculum Press. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.curriculumpress.edu.au/index.php

Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc. (2011). Britannica Kids- Ancient Egypt (Version 2.1) [iPad application software]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/britannica-kids-ancient-egypt/id388254830?mt=8

Fitgerald, L. (2014). Resourcing the curriculum [ETL503 Module 2.5]. Retrieved March 29, 2014, from Charles Sturt University website: http://interact.csu.edu.au/portal/site/ETL503_201430_W_D/page/107347c1-3a72-453a-8091-13f98fefcf2c

Fox, M. (2012). The ancient Egypt ebook. Retrieved from SCIS catalogue.

Herring, J. (2007). Teacher librarians and the school library. In S. Ferguson (Ed.) Libraries in the twenty-first century: charting new directions in information (p. 27-42). Wagga Wagga, NSW:

Hughes-Hassell, S. & Mancall, J.C. (2005). Collection Management for Youth : Responding to the Needs of Learners. Retrieved from http://www.eblib.com

Hurdman, C., Steele, P. & Tames, R. (2013). Find out about ancient Egypt, Rome & Greece. Anness Publishing.

MAD Learning. (2012). Pocket history ancient Egypt (Version 2.1.1) [iPad application software]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/pocket-history-ancient-egypt/id406913983?mt=8

Morris, C. (2010). Successful classrooms for indigenous students. Retrieved from http://www.daretolead.edu.au/STORY_Successful_Classrooms_Conference_report

Noon, T., Landrigan, K., Haselhurst, T., Drapalski, T., McPherson, J., & McNamee, C. (2013). Ashcroft High School: Annual school report. Retrieved from Ashcroft High School website: http://www.ashcroft-h.schools.nsw.edu.au/documents/4089790/4095893/Ashcroft%20HS%20ASR%202012.pdf

Secrets of the afterlife: Magic, Mummies & immortality. (2013). Welshpool, WA: Western Australia Museum.

The Children’s University of Manchester. (2009). Ancient Egypt. Retrieved from The Children’s University of Manchester website: http://www.childrensuniversity.manchester.ac.uk/interactives/history/egypt/

The Paul Getty Museum. (2011). Mummification Process- animation. Retrieved from The Paul Getty Museum website: http://www.getty.edu/art/videos/mummification_process/mummification_process.html

SCIS Catalouge. (2014). Retrieved from http://www2.curriculum.edu.au/scis/home.html

Scootle. (2014). Retrived from https://www.scootle.edu.au/ec/p/home

Valenzuela H. (2014). ETL501 Adapted selection criteria. Retrieved from WordPress website: https://hannav102.wordpress.com/2014/04/05/342/

Woollacott, A. (2012). History for the Australian Curriculum 7. Teacher resource package. Series: No.1. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press.

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ETL 503 Adapted selection criteria

The Hughes-Hassell and Mancall’s (2005, p. 46-47) learner-centred selection criteria provides a good overview that can be used to base the selection of resources in the high school I currently work at. The idea of making selection appropriate to the school clientele and purchasing, as Hughes-Hassell & Mancall state (2005, p. 43), ‘the most appropriate’ resources opposed to ‘the best’ resources is only logical. However to make this selection criteria specific to my school additions need to be included. Due to budgeting restrictions and the introduction of new technology, new criteria such as cost and format will need to be added for the selection criteria to be used in my high school library context.

Hughes-Hassell and Mancall’s set of contextualised general selection criteria (2005, p. 46-47).

Primary considerations
Criteria Questions to consider
Appropriateness Is the content appropriate for my learners?Does it match their development level? Reading level? Social development? Learning style? Ethnic or cultural background?

Will the work be of interest to my learners?

Scope What is the purpose of the work?Is the level of detail appropriate for my learners?

Does it support the school curriculum or interests of the students?

Accuracy Is the material up-to-date and accurate?Are opinions and biases, if they exist, acknowledged as such?

Does the creator of the work identify the sources used to create it?

Does the creator cite credible sources, including specialists or experts in the subject area?

Treatment Is the style of presentation appropriate for the subject matter and does it have appeal to my learners?Does the creator avoid stereotypes dealing with race, gender, age, region and socioeconomic level?

Does the resource reflect our diverse society?

Arrangement and organisation Is the information arranged and organised so that students can understand it?Is the resource organised so that students can easily locate information?
Authority What are the creator’s qualifications?How knowledgeable is the creator about the subject?

Does the creator cite credible sources, including specialists or experts in the subject area?

Has the creator published or produced other materials on this topic?

Comparison with other works How does this work compare with others in the same genre and format or on the same subject?How might my learners use this work?

How might my educators use it with students?

 Secondary considerations
 Criteria  Questions to consider
Physical quality Do physical elements such as the clarity of images, illustrations, speech and music, the consistency of navigation icons, and the legibility of typefaces or fonts support the purpose of the work and the learning styles of my learners?
 Aesthetic quality Will the work appeal to the aesthetic tastes of my learners?
Literary merit How well does the author, illustrator or producer deal with literary components such as theme, setting, character and style?
Reputation of author, illustrator or producer Do my learners use other works by this individual and would they find this title interesting and worthwhile?

 

Below are additional selection criteria that will need to be taken into consideration in my school context when selection resources to add to the school collection.

Additional primary considerations
 Criteria  Questions to consider
Format Is the software compatible with the school networks?Do students and teachers know how to use and access new formats?

Is the medium going to engage the learner?

 Additional Secondary considerations
Criteria Questions to consider
Cost Is it value for money?Will other items need to be sacrificed to purchase it?

Can other faculties contribute to its purchase making it more affordable?

 

Reference

Hughes-Hassell, Sandra; Mancall, Jaqueline C. (2005). Collection Management for Youth : Responding to the Needs of Learners. Retrieved from http://www.csuau.eblib.com.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=289075&echo=1&userid=z%2fOioPKZpXZST4YN08WgVw%3d%3d&tstamp=1396759146&id=EF092BF7CAAC3B246900F888DA773921C66A9519

 

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